gary's blog

Study: Major moral decisions use the reward circuitry to manage uncertainty

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There is more here than meets the eye. What this study suggests is that we use our reward circuitry for moral decisions. Our reward circuitry is a big part of our moral compass. The abstract is below the article. It mentions 3 parts of the brain used in moral decsions - all parts of the reward circuitry. (the ventral striatum is the nucleus accumben - which is considered THE reward center.
So - what affects our reward circuitry then affects our moral compass - because they are inseparable

MAJOR MORAL DECISIONS USE GENERAL PURPOSE BRAIN CIRCUITS TO MANAGE UNCERTAINTY

Attention Couch Potatoes: Walking Boosts Brain Connectivity, Function

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Attention Couch Potatoes: Walking Boosts Brain Connectivity, Function

Psychology professor and Beckman Institute director Art Kramer, doctoral student Michelle Voss and their colleagues found that a year of moderate walking improved the connectivity of specific brain networks in older adults.

Anti-Addiction Drug Breaks Dopamines Vicious Cycle (Kudzu extract)

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Anti Addiction Drug Breaks Dopamines Vicious Cycle

Even by the standards of drug discovery, finding effective treatments for addiction has been a tough nut to crack. For cocaine addiction, for example, there have been dozens of trials of various pharmacological agents – dopamine antagonists, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, antipsychotics. But "not a single one with any proof of efficacy," Ivan Diamond told BioWorld Today.

Peeling Away Theories on Gender and the Brain

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Peeling Away Theories on Gender and the Brain, By KATHERINE BOUTON

“Delusions of Gender” takes on that tricky question, Why exactly are men from Mars and women from Venus?, and eviscerates both the neuroscientists who claim to have found the answers and the popularizers who take their findings and run with them.

ADDICTED TO LOVE

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ADDICTED TO LOVE
By Jennifer Gibson, PharmD

Robert Palmer may have already known what researchers now claim: Love can be an addiction. In a new study published in the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, investigators examined and compared the clinical, psychological and biological details of love, passion, gambling, and substance dependence. It turns out that an addiction to love is almost indistinguishable from other addictions.

Ovulation hormones make women choose clingy clothes

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Ovulation hormones make women choose clingy clothes
August 5, 2010

Women are more likely to select clingy clothes when they are ovulating, a study has found.
But the University of Minnesota study of 100 women found these hormonal shopping habits were triggered by the proximity of attractive women.

The researchers suggest in selecting tighter clothes, the women were trying to stand out from love rivals.
The Journal of Consumer Research study said there should be more analysis of how hormones affected shopping habits.

Junk food addicted rats chose to starve themselves rather than eat healthy food

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Junk food addicted rats chose to starve themselves rather than eat healthy food

David Gutierrez
Natural News [1]
Aug 6, 2010

A diet including unlimited amounts of junk food can cause rats to become so addicted to the unhealthy diet that they will starve themselves rather than go back to eating healthy food, researchers have discovered.

Brains reward system helps drive placebo effect

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Brains reward system helps drive placebo effect

Reuters Health) - Want to maximize the placebo effect? A good way to do this, according to a new study, is to tell someone they have a decent chance of getting the real treatment instead of a fake pill, but keep them guessing.

In the study, Parkinson's disease patients given a placebo after being told they had a 75 percent chance of receiving an active drug produced significant amounts of dopamine, a chemical key to the brain's reward system that is scarce in the brains of patients with this disease.,

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