Companionate love triggers a smile?

Submitted by freedom on
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What do you all make of this - http://www.relationshipsandlove.com/TheGoodStuffCup.htm - and specifically the smiling test mentioned toward the top of the page? I initially thought the smiling test was hooey, but I've since had an experience that lead to just such an effect despite never having met the person or having any romantic feeling at all for them. We have had limited online correspondence only. That site claims repeated rewards leads to liking leads to companionate love and many other sites confirm companionate love takes time to develop. In my case the smiling started almost instantaneously so apparently a slowly unfolding friendship isn’t the only pathway (granted I had an unusual circumstance I don't want to publicly post about). How easy is it to short-circuit the usual love brain pathways? Is the smiling always connected to companionate love? Or could other things be at play?

What actually triggers this type of smile? Or any smile for that matter? I tried researching smiles online and came up rather empty handed with the info all over the place. Have any of you had a similar experience where the thought of a person, even fleetingly, triggers a smile?

Either way, now that I know this is possible I want to figure out how to develop this with a future partner. I don't think it will just come about on its own. It is not familial love. I don’t experience this with any other person. I don't think one can get in too large an argument with someone while smiling. And combined with other forms of love and bonding, the smile should be even more powerful. It is a consciously soothing smile, different than when laughing at a joke, smiling with friends, etc. This has been going on for several months with no sign of fading.

Anyone have any other links on this or a related topic? Or just random thoughts?

Comments

I have a random thought

Smiling is a powerful bonding behavior...that is, it's a subconscious attachment cue that sends a message directly to an old part of the brain. For more, see "The Lazy Way to Stay in Love": http://www.reuniting.info/lazy_way_to_stay_in_love

The good news is that it's not the only bonding behavior that works. Wink

Why not post your experience and link under that article, if you think they are relevant?